#bestdayever

#BESTDAYEVER

Great Canadian Heli Skiing Great Canadian Heli Skiing
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Flexible Packages

TAKE A SNOW DAY, OR TWO TO TEN.

Your schedule is our schedule. We offer 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10-day packages that start on every day of the week to make it easier for you to join us.

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YOUR EXPERIENCE

IF OUR GROUPS WERE ANY SMALLER, YOU'D BE FLYING THE HELICOPTER.

Great Canadian Heli-skiing was born in 1988 when a guide and few heli-skiing guests wanted to recapture the spirit of adventure by pioneering small groups.

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OUR STORIES

BETTER, NOT BIGGER.

Great Canadian Heli-skiing was born in 1988 when a guide and few heli-skiing guests wanted to recapture the spirit of adventure by pioneering small groups.

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Conditions + Terrain

YOU DIDN’T PAY TO GO HELI-SIT-IN-THE-LODGE-ING.

The Purcell and Selkirk ranges are our playground and they offer every type of skiing imaginable; pillows, glades, and wide-open powder fields.

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heli skiing Canada Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash
GCH EXPERIENCE

Skier aggressiveness type

heli skiing Canada

“SKIER TYPE” IS AN AGGRESSIVENESS RATING USED FOR SETTING YOUR BINDINGS (DIN)

Determining your skier type is your responsibility!
Your skier type, height, weight, age and ski boot sole length are used by the ski technician to determine the visual indicator settings of your ski bindings, referred to as your DIN setting. Be sure to provide accurate information, as any error may increase your risk of injury.

Type I
cautious skiing at lighter release/retention settings

Type II
moderate skiing at average release/retention settings

Type III
aggressive skiing at higher release/retention settings

Consult the following descriptions to select your classification:

Type 1: “Cautious skiing at LOWER visual indicator settings”

  • Prefer slow to moderate speeds.
  • Prefer gentle to moderate terrain.
  • Receive lower than average visual indicator settings. This may Increase the risk of inadvertent binding release in order to increase the likelihood of release in a fall.
  • Type 1 settings apply to entry-level skiers uncertain of their classification.


Type 2: “Moderate skiing at AVERAGE visual indicator settings”

  • Prefer a variety of speeds.
  • Prefer varied terrain.
  • Receive higher average visual indicator settings.


Type 3: “Aggressive skiing at HIGHER visual indicator settings”

  • Prefer fast speeds.
  • Prefer steeper terrain.
  • Receive higher than average visual indicator settings. This may reduce the likelihood of release in a fall in order to decrease the risk of inadvertent binding release.

If from experience, you have been dissatisfied with visual indicator settings resulting from your selected skier type classification, you may wish to consider: (a) changing your skier type classification; (b) selecting different skier type classifications for toe and heel components; (c) selecting Type 3+ (“for skiers who desire visual indicator settings higher than settings for a Type 3 skier”)